Close-up and Macro Photography Tutorial

Close-up and Macro Photography Tutorial
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Photography is much more than using the rule of thirds. Many photographic styles require special tricks and know-how you pick up from just simply shooting. Here are a few of my favourite tips for taking close-up and macro shots.
More of Leigh Cavanaugh’s photography can be found on Instagram: @leighcavanaugh

LEFT: This photo was taken in Scotland on the Isle of Skye. More specifically, the grounds surrounding Armadale Castle, the ancient home of clan Donald.
1 – Use Negative Space:
Often it isn’t so much the subject matter but the space around the subject that captures a viewer’s attention. Try visualizing this negative space as a part of your composition when shooting and use it to create interesting crops.
2 – Find Naturally Occurring Colours:
Still-life comes fully equipped with a wide array of patterns and colours, look for these elements and try to capture them in a manner that emphasizes that one special feature.
ABOVE: The photo of the tulip was taken during winter, believe it or not. Allan Gardens has a great year-round centre open to the public.
BELOW: Having grown up in Toronto, I don’t view the city as the most interesting place to photograph. So I try to go outside this perspective and view my surroundings with a new light. The photo is of an art installation in the Distillery District.
3 – Look for Unique Light Play:
Lighting is a key element in any photograph, but it’s not just about how the light shines on something, but what it looks like going through an object. Getting close can allow you to capture all the refractions and subtle nuances not seen otherwise.
4 – Wait for the Moment:
Sometimes the right photo moments present themselves to you and other times you need to wait for them. The seasonal cycle is a great photo opportunity, but it will take a while to come around again if you miss that perfect shot. As soon as you see something of interest make sure to capture it right away.
LEFT: Ice formations have always been interesting macro shots, paired with winter’s blue tones it creates a lush visual.

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